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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
the bleeding. if there had been one of us there, not together, we might have stopped, but we were there together. it was in our program, here, and the nurses still talk about it because the shipfts change but e do not. we were sitting on stools, dozing off, waiting for this position -- this patient. the patient eventually stopped bleeding and walked out of the hospital and was well. >> i know you will not name the person. i will just ask the question. the most difficult situation that you have ever had? >> i have it. >> ago. >> it is a great story. i was operating on a priest. i had just taken a vein out of the priests le's leg. a surgeon came in and needed my help. he had a young lady who had an appendectomy, but she had cardiac arrest. her heart stopped and we are not sure what is wrong with her. she was about 28 years old. i went over and looked, and i thought she had a big blood clot to her lon -- lung. because of who the patient was, i made the decision to move the patient. i moved her into the operating room and i open her chest and open the artery were i thought the blood c
" give us an overview. >> icing we live in a world of the enormous transition, not just transition from one kind of presidential administration to a very different one, but obviously one in economic transition with a lot of the unquestioned rules of our economy being up for grabs. also, in the case of america, a social transition is -- as the party -- country becomes more of another minority dominated party. >> how long have you been writing your column? >> that is a good question. i am guessing about 10 years. maybe even longer. i am terrible about dates. >> 1999. i guess that is about 10 years. you have been in politics for about 10 years? >> i have been in politics since early 1994. >> not many people write one column zero weeks. have you approached this? >> it is completely different from doing good twice a week column that is half that size, which i did the first several years that i did this. it has to sustain itself as an essay at that linked. -- at that lengeth. the single most important thing is is this -- is to sustain and meredith. i like to find a topic that lends itself to
of coming to these issues. >> can you give us a couple of examples? >> one current example we have seen, henry louis gates and segeant crowley who arrested him. the initial response was to call the policeman stupid. in fact, the respond eight currently -- to respond angrily. only one out of five whites liked that reaction. that is just one example of many impinges on race in this society. we tend to look at it quite differently as a consequence of our different histories and different sets of experiences. >> how many years have been with "newsweek"? >> 15 years. >> who is the first person that asked you to write about race? >> that would actually be college. i began writing professionally when i was 18, but i began college when i was 17. before i got my job the "chicago sun-times," my first real writing job, i was editing a publication at my university in chicago. we are talking about the late 1960's and early 1970's, a time when race was very much an issue. we were dealing with the assassination of one of the leaders of the black panther party, which was big news in chicago. we were de
study on the impact rising health costs are having on u.s. industries. see live tomorrow at 1:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. . . >> on saturday, july 25, after walter cronkite died, you wrote a column in the "washington post." >> i said back in 1972 when i had a serious role in senator mcgovern's presidential candidate. we had to pick a vice presidential candidate. my choice was walter cronkite. he was the most trusted man in america. he was the anchor for everybody i was voted down -- for everybody. i was voted down unanimously. they said it would look bad if he turns it down. so let's go to a more mainstream politician which we did. >> wanted to take walter cronkite would take the job? >> i knew that he was very much opposed to the vietnam war. six months before that, he had come back from vietnam and immediately called me and asked to see robert kennedy. the two of them met. he said that the senator had to run for president and he went on to say how they could not be one. the vietnamese in the south may not like the north but they like us less. kennedy said to him that he would run
in the "the new york times" give us a view of where we are now. >> i and we live in a world that is an enormous transition. not just a transition from one kind of presidential the administration to a very different one, but obviously one in economic transition and a lot of the unquestioned rules of our economy being up for grabs. in case of america, a social transition as the country becomes more and more of a minority dominated country which is causing some interesting fissions. obviously, we are in transition around the world of american foreign policy tries to redefine itself in the middle east once again and tries to remake itself. >> how long have you been writing your 1500 word column? >> that is a good question. i am guessing about 10 years. maybe even longer i am terrible about dates. >> 1999, i guess that works out to 10 years. you have been in politics for 15 years? >> wright, i have been in the op ed and page of the times since 1994. >> not many people write one column week. how your project? -- how do you approach it? >> it is completely different from doing the
not be one. they would not like us less. kennedy said to him that he would run for president if you would run for the senate in new york. cronkite laughed and said that he could not because he did not live in new york, he lived in connecticut. secondly, he said he was not a democrat, he was registered as an independent. i knew he had those feelings about the war and he would take it seriously. he certainly couldn't out vote anyone else like to think of. >> that was 1968. >> no, that was 1972. >> where was that meeting held? the meeting with mr. cronkite and mr. kennedy. >> in senator kennedy's office. on capitol hill. what's how had to come to know senator kennedy in the first place? >> i came to know him because he called me up one day when i was an official in the peace corps. i was the regional director for latin america. i called him up when he was going to latin america as his first trip. because he knew i had been there, some friends of his told him i had lived in peru and he wanted to check the schedule at the state department with me. he visited the american school in the morning and
>> today on c-span2, a discussion on health care and the u.s. economy, posted by the advanced medical technology association. live coverage starts at 10:30 eastern on c-span2. >> tonight, texas republican john culberson shows how politicians use technology to stay in touch with their constituents. >> this week on "q&a," we do cafaro discussion on health care talking with doctors and staff at the virginia hospital center. we talked to doctor john garrett, chief of cardiac surgery. >> doctor john garrett, chairman of the board of directors of the virginia hospital center, can you remember the first moment you thought you might want be a doctor? >> i think so. my stepfather was a surgeon. and for lots of reasons, i wanted to be like my stepfather. so from about age 7 when he came into my life, i kind of wanted to copy him. i think it got a little more serious than that when i was in high school i injured my hip, dislocated my hip in a skiing accident. i had to be a hospital for about seven weeks where they pinned my knee and contraction and had a lot of time to just play and obse
the bleeding. and i think if there had been one of us there, not together, you know we might have stopped. but we were there together. and we were in our program here, and the nurses still talk about it, because the shifts changed and we didn't. and they talked about us both sitting on little stools by the operating table. dozing off, waiting for this patient, we wouldn't give up. and the patient eventually stopped bleeding, and walked out of the hospital. and was well. >> i know you won't name the person, or well, i will ask the question. the most difficult patient situation you have ever had that you can think of? >> ok. i have it. >> go. >> it's a great story. it's been years ago, but i was operating on a priest. and i had just begun taking the vein out of the priest's leg in the operating room. i was by myself. and one of the general surgeons came in the room and said, i really need your help. we have a young lady that has had an appendectomy, her appendix removed. but she's had cardiac arrest, her heart has stopped, and we are not sure what is wrong with her. she's about 28 years old
robert kennedy, and two of them met. i with us there and he began by saying senator you have to run for president because this wore has got to end and went on to say how unwinning it was. said we would win a village in the daytime and have to give it back at the night. vietnamese in the south may not like the north, but they like us less. i knew and kennedy said to him, well then i'll run for president if you run for the senate in new york and cronkite laughed and said i can't. we're closing the first place, i don't live in new york. i live in connecticut and i'm not a democrat. i'm an independent but i knew he had those feelings about the war so, i thought, well maybe he might accept but he would take it seriously i thought. he certainly could out run and out vote anybody else i could think of. >> that was 1968? >> no. 1972. >> where was that meeting held? >> with kennedy? >> mr. cronkite and senator kennedy. on capitol hill? what was your job? >> i was kennedy's press secretary. >> how had you come to know him in the first place? >> he called me up one day when i was offic
. in the u.s.. -- the future of broadband in the u.s. to go this week on today, our guest is bruce chadwick. -- >> this week on q&a, our guest is bruce chadwick. why have we not heard that much of that george with in our lifetime? -- george whip. >> this idea hit me in the head. i was in the library researching another book about the revolution, and i fell against the schultze. as i did, obama have yourself was a hard down copy of a small journal. it fell down and hit me in the head and landed on the floor. it said the murder of george wit. he was one of the unknown founding fathers pitted i did not know he had been murdered -- but i did not know she had been murdered -- i did not know he had been murdered. he propped himself up by his fellows, stared at his doctor and in a whisper said, i am murdered. that is where i got the title from. >> you mean if you had not lost or balance, we would never had this book? >> that is exactly right. >> i thought it was wthel. why did we not hear more about him over the years? he is a fascinating character. >> the reason people do not know a lot about him
in alexand ria virginia with his name. i will get you to tell us about him. he is a fascinating character. >> the reason that people do not know a lot about him is because unlike most people, the only book he wrote was a legal book on his decisions when he was a judge. he never kept a diary. there was very little impression about him. he served in the continental congress during the war. he could have been on the supreme court but turned down an appointment to it. almost all of his life was spent in his native virginia. virginians know a lot about him. there is a county named after him. there are some statues of him and schools are named after him, but when you cross the virginia line, he is an unknown founding father. when i get into this as a homicide investigation, i became unbelievably impressed with how great an american he was. >> to the mentor? >> thomas jefferson. >> who else? >> john marshall, chief justice of the supreme court. james monroe, dozens of senators, congressmen and governors of virginia. when he later moved to richmond, henry clay. henry clay used to tell people all
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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